Photo by Darrell James/ Viking- A compressed natural gas engine sits in the LBCC Auto Mechanics/Diesel department at the PCC. The engine type is often used in Long Beach Public Transportation buses according to Instructional Assistant Demetre Dovalis.
Photo by Darrell James/ Viking- A compressed natural gas engine sits in the LBCC Auto Mechanics/Diesel department at the PCC. The engine type is often used in Long Beach Public Transportation buses according to Instructional Assistant Demetre Dovalis.

Story By Jeff Dahlquist/Staff Writer/@jdahlasign

Photo By Darrell James/Photo and Image Editor/@darrellJames_

The Advanced Transportation Technology Center at LBCC’s PCC is taking strides preparing ecological advancement of tomorrow’s transportation.
The project looks at new methods to power vehicles with alternative fuels besides the standard combustion engine.
In a 2006 City magazine article, students Jason Davenport and Daniel Quintero, as well as others in the class, powered a car using french fry oil. Students obtain valuable skills in the automotive trade.
Student James Romero, said, “We use Cummings insight diagnostic software to find fault codes and diagnose problems.”
Romero said he is studying at the center to obtain a certificate in alternative-fuels. According to the curriculum guide, the certificate and degree programs prepare students for an entry-level position as a light-medium or heavy-duty technician.
Students prepare for a career in alternative-fuel vehicle conversion, maintenance and repair using state-of-the-art-equipment.
With a heavy emphasis on computerized-engine management, the mission of the alternative fuels program provides students training in servicing and maintaining alternatively-fueled vehicles in the light-medium and heavy-duty engine platforms, leading to a certificate or an AS degree.
Students learn to work on high-pressure and low-temperature fuels without injury and diagnose and repair computer-controlled, gaseous-fueled engines. They are taught to comply with regulations with installations, inspections and related components.
Advanced transportation technology center coordinator Cal Macy said in an email, the electric vehicle program is preparing to purchase a Tesla for use, and met with Tesla management to become a satellite training center.
The center has had a site inspection by Tesla and according to Macy, “They are as excited as we are about the program.”
Tesla and the center are planning to structure paid internships at Tesla for graduates.
Macy notes that “they are expanding in this area and want us as a partner.”
More information about the center is available online at lbcc.edu/attc, calling (562) 938-3067 or emailing Cal Macy at cmacy@lbcc.edu
Students are also encouraged to visit them at the PCC in Building JJ.