BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING: Fashion design major Jacqueline Garcia, 22, sits in the T Building. She said she isn’t concerned about who might be tracking her online: “I respect what Apple is doing since they are taking all of us into consideration.”
BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING: Fashion design major Jacqueline Garcia, 22, sits in the T Building. She said she isn’t concerned about who might be tracking her online: “I respect what Apple is doing since they are taking all of us into consideration.”

Story and photo by Jerick Leblanc/Staff writer/@jerickjake

Concerning the demand by the FBI that Apple release data on the iPhone of San Bernardino terrorist Syed Rizwan, LBCC students have a divided opinion on civil liberty infringement and personal Internet securities.
According to an article from the LB Press Telegram, Feb. 22, “U.S. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym, based in Riverside, ordered the company last week to help the FBI access the password-protected phone, but Apple has resisted, saying such a move could compromise the security of all iPhone owners’ information.
Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook, from a report from the Associated Press, said, “We have no tolerance or sympathy for terrorists,” Cook wrote in an early morning email, Feb. 22, addressed to the Apple team, “When they commit unspeakable acts like the tragic attacks in San Bernardino, we work to help the authorities pursue justice for the victims.”
But he reiterated the company’s position that to hack the San Bernardino gunman’s phone would ultimately risk “security of hundreds of millions of law-abiding people.”
Communications major Jessica Hernandez, 21 said, “I believe that Apple withholding the information from the FBI in this case is the right thing to do. As unfortunate as the events were in San Bernardino, the right to privacy even after death is something that everybody should have.” Hernandez added, “If Apple were to give information in this specific case, it would open the doors for the government to gain access to our own information at the simple request of the FBI.”
Cook said, if the company’s engineers were to do as ordered, Apple would do its best to protect the technology, but the company “would be relentlessly attacked by hackers and cybercriminals.”
MSNBC reported on Feb. 23 that Microsoft founder Bill Gates has weighed in on the FBI’s request for unlocking the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter and he isn’t siding with Apple.
Psychology major J.P. Napier, 32, said, “I think it is hilarious that technology has out-sprinted the justice department, leaving them to rely on the power of the court and admit to the entire world that just maybe if a person invests in an iPhone, he also purchases a little more of his freedom to privacy along the way.”
An article from the Huffington Post stated, “The Justice Department has since filed a motion seeking to compel Apple to comply, labeling its resistance a “marketing strategy.” In response, Apple called for the formation of a government commission on data privacy.”