Stephanie Toro, 20, a child development major, looks at Ehren Tool’s “Out Of Thousands” clay cups during the “Three U.S. Veterans” art exhibit opening Thursday, Oct. 22. The cups will be donated to staff and faculty during the closing reception on Thursday, Nov. 19.
Stephanie Toro, 20, a child development major, looks at Ehren Tool’s “Out Of Thousands” clay cups during the “Three U.S. Veterans” art exhibit opening Thursday, Oct. 22. The cups will be donated to staff and faculty during the closing reception on Thursday, Nov. 19.

By Omar Reyes
Staff Writer
Twitter: @salar0895

Glass bones, photographs and clay cups were on display as visitors entered the LBCC art gallery Thursday, Oct. 22, for the opening reception of the exhibit “Three U.S. Veterans.”

Timed before and after Veterans Day, the display in the K100 art gallery at the LAC showcases military women and men.

Raven Still, 21, an art major, said, “It shows you don’t have to go a traditional way in art. This art is more than pencil drawings. It’s a creative way to where you can see somebody make a living off of that.”

The free exhibit includes three displays. William Short and Willa Seidenberg display their “Memories of the American War,” Ehren Tool shows “Out Of Thousands” and Michael Aschenbrenner offers “No Place Left to Hide-Return.”

The decision to include three U.S. veterans in the gallery was made by Trevor Norris, art gallery coordinator at LBCC.

Short and Aschenbrenner served in Vietnam and Tool in the Gulf War.
Norris said, “It’s more work about how the artist responded to the war, their experience and how they were able to channel that into making artwork.”

Aschenbrenner was at the opening reception talking to students about his artwork along with Short and Seidenberg and their 17-year-old son, Sam. Tool was not present at the opening reception.

Aschenbrenner got the idea for his work, which features glass bones in splints, after suffering a leg injury in Vietnam. The veteran said he hopes his artwork is seen by students as a war memorial.

He said, “This is more realistic because it shows what happens after and during the physical breaking of the body, the emotional breaking and coming home and healing and trying to resolve all those issues, whether physical or emotional.”

One of Tool’s artworks features cups of clay with war images imprinted on them. Norris said Tool’s intention is to donate some of the cups to students and some to the employees of LBCC in the closing reception of the exhibit, as well as one to President Eloy Oakley, a veteran who served four years in the U.S. Army. Norris plans to host a raffle for students to win the cups.

On Tool’s donation of his artwork, Still said, “I think it’s really generous of the artist because there aren’t many artists who would make so many original pieces and then just donate them, so it’s quite generous of him to do that, especially for the school.”

The exhibitions in the gallery will remain open until Thursday, Nov. 19, which will include the closing reception. After the artists’ presentations from 7-8 p.m., a live Skype chat with Tool is planned from 8-8:30 p.m.

The gallery’s hours are Mondays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Tuesdays and Wednesdays from noon to 8 p.m.

The gallery will be closed Wednesday, Nov. 11 for Veterans Day, but will be open Saturday, Nov. 14, from noon to 4 p.m.