Photo by Hunter King Grant Boyer, a soon-to-be retiree in his office on Friday, May 22. Boyer has been teaching Criminal Justice at LBCC for 31 years.
Photo by Hunter King
Grant Boyer, a soon-to-be retiree in his office on Friday, May 22. Boyer has been teaching Criminal Justice at LBCC for 31 years.

By Hunter King/CityStyle Editor

Among the faculty retiring in 2015 is Grant Boyer, professor of criminal justice. Boyer first began teaching at LBCC part-time in 1977, while he was still serving as a Long Beach police officer. After 7 years of part-time, he took up teaching full-time for an additional 24 years.
In addition to his 20 years as a police officer, Boyer has also served as President of the Public Safety Advisor Commission and  a member of the citizen’s complaint commission. As a former officer, sitting on the citizen’s complaint commission gave Boyer another perspective on law enforcement, as the commission was created to keep officers accountable for their actions.
Before serving as a police officer, Boyer served a tour in Vietnam.  After suffering an injury, he was able to refocus his efforts on attaining his master’s degree while in rehabilitation. He explained that his experience in the Army prepared him for a career in law enforcement.
Serving as a police officer exposed Boyer to some dark sides of society and he said, “I can’t let it get to me.” Despite the hardships, he focuses on the good in society and said, “Most people are good, they’re just looking to put a little extra bread on the table.”
Transitioning into education has been satisfying for Boyer who makes an effort to connect with students and keep in touch with them after they have graduated. “When a former student returns to say ‘thank you,’ that’s better than a paycheck, it gives me a sense of accomplishment,” Boyer said.
For now, Boyer plans to spend more time with his wife and 8 grandkids. Besides spending time with family, he loves to fish and plans to get out on the water more often. He also plans to stay involved with LBCC, health permitting. He said, “I’ll miss it, but I might return part-time to teach evidence classes.”
For Boyer, teaching is his legacy. He said, “Acquiring an education is like receiving a key to door that you wouldn’t otherwise be able to open. It expands opportunity.”
Being able to transfer his skills and abilities to the next generation is how his passion for justice will live on.