Cindy Macias/Viking Michael Borja, 24, a radiology technician major, walks past the P building on Wednesday, April 15. The building is the oldest buildings on campus having been constructed in the mid-1930s. The building houses the English Department that also includes creative writing and journalism classes. The structure is scheduled for major renovation in 2016 and 2017.
Cindy Macias/Viking
Michael Borja, 24, a radiology technician major, walks past the P building on Wednesday, April 15. The building is the oldest buildings on campus having been constructed in the mid-1930s. The building houses the English Department that also includes creative writing and journalism classes. The structure is scheduled for major renovation in 2016 and 2017.

By Darel James/Staff Writer

Since its opening in 1927, the buildings of the LBCC campuses have remained pieces of history modified through time. Structures built after the college’s 1935 relocation from Wilson High School and Recreation Park may not maintain their original look today, but still remain connected despite the present architectural appearance.
Though the complexes differ in size and student capacity, pieces of their history remain visible in design.
Many features still resemble what the old buildings used to look like.
Some complexes at the LAC are still holding to true to the mission-style design that began to develop on the campus after its transition from the high school to its present location at Carson Street and Clark Avenue.
An excerpt from the “First 50 years of LBCC” history book said, “The original buildings on Carson Street in the mid-30s set the tone and style for those which would follow in later years: mission architecture with tile roofs, gleaming white exterior walls and pleasant patios.”
A few of the features can still be seen in areas such as the P Building, which is a low one-story with varied height and red-tile rooftop. The building was part of the college’s first chain of buildings that were constructed during the campus’s early development.
At one point, the north half of the campus was home to physical education departments and facilities and also contained a field where sporting events were conducted from 1935 to 1950. The areas are now home to the K Building for art, the Auditorium and the Library.
The A Building’s clock tower was constructed during renovations from 1950 to 1951. The overall project brought the completion of the first phase of art, music and life science buildings. During the modification, the original physical education facilities on the north portion of the campus were moved south of Carson Street.
The overpass that bridges the north and south portions of the LAC was completed in Spring 1956. The new addition was introduced due to heavy student and vehicle traffic with only one established crosswalk at Faculty Avenue.
Another excerpt from “The First 50 years of LBCC” book said, “Traffic on Carson was therefore backed up by swarms of students going north or south between classes. Impatient motorists and late stragglers dashing across were a constant hazard and there was an increased demand for stop signs or a signal.”
Recent constructions are bringing the PCC and LAC a new era for a new generation.
Kinesiology major Arturo Angel, 38, said, “As long as the integrity of the architecture isn’t compromised through harsh renovations, I feel that students can still enjoy the many nice features still around campus.”