Photo by Darel James/ Viking- Art major Anthony Sok, 28, Left alongside drawing/painting major, Everett Bbcock, 24 observes displayed work by artist Keith Walsh in the LBCC art gallery at the LAC. Works from the creative minds of Walsh and Kim Abeles were on display in the gallery Wednesday, Feb. 11 from 4 to 7 p.m.
Photo by Darel James/ Viking- Art major Anthony Sok, 28, Left alongside drawing/painting major, Everett Bbcock, 24 observes displayed work by artist Keith Walsh in the LBCC art gallery at the LAC. Works from the creative minds of Walsh and Kim Abeles were on display in the gallery Wednesday, Feb. 11 from 4 to 7 p.m.

By Darel James / Staff Writer

The LAC art gallery in the K Building was filled with interested students, employees and visitors on Wednesday, Feb. 11 during  the Keith Walsh and Kim Abeles art exhibition.

The exhibition was the first of the Spring semester. Gallery coordinator Trevor Norris said, “I encourage the people coming in to ask questions, look around, get to know the space and enjoy the work.” Norris is in his first full year as coordinator.

Visitors glancing along the gallery walls had a choice of viewing both solo galleries by each artist.

Abeles presented visitors a 120-foot photographic masterpiece titled “The Golden Mile.” The project consisted of individual photographs taken over four years. The pictures were then stitched together creating a lengthy photographic banner.

Displaying the entire main street of West Bromwich in the West Midlands of the United Kingdom, the piece included 1506 photographs. Abeles said, “I’ve always been a person to just dive into my work.

“Whenever I have been curious about something in the world, I have always tried to make myself part of it.”

Walsh took visitors on a journey through the process of creating art with his work. Titled “The Cabs,” short for cabinets, Walsh wanted to show observers the stages of creating starting from 2-D paper to 3-D sculpture.

Sculpture models placed in the center of his gallery worked in connection with sketched drawings along the walls.

The drawings represented the beginning of the art process such as basic shapes, color choices and measurements for the finished piece. The sculptures themselves were the finished product.

Walsh said, “I wanted to remind observers of the wonder of form, knowing the sense of shape and its dimension. It comes from an idea that has no dimension which you must create.”

For more information on upcoming exhibitions and general information, people may contact the LBCC art gallery at 562-938-4815. Current gallery hours are Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.–3 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday noon–7:30 p.m. On Saturday, March 7, the gallery will open from noon-4 p.m.