Photo by Brandon Richardson/Viking - Students try to carry on a conversation as loud construction continues on Building GG beside the trailers at the PCC on Monday, Feb. 23.
Photo by Brandon Richardson/Viking – Students try to carry on a conversation as loud construction continues on Building GG beside the trailers at the PCC on Monday, Feb. 23.

By Sylvana Uribe / Staff Writer

Sounds of power tools and heavy machinery echo throughout the PCC as construction continues on the GG Building, which will house student services.

The structure is expected to be completed in Spring 2016. Services will include admissions and records, Financial Aid, counseling, Extended Opportunity Programs and Services, Disabled Student Programs and Services and the cashier’s office.

The GG Building also will include classrooms and a food court. The 31,698-square-foot project is set to cost $23.4 million.

On Jan. 27, the college celebrated the opening of the PCC Buildings AA and BB. AA, the new administration building, stands at 30,165 square feet. Building BB is 14,768 square feet. Together they house the new administrative wing, workforce development services, computer labs, faculty offices and classrooms.

Lihour Hul, 19, a business administration major, said, “I’m glad students are going to benefit from the changes and have access to resources they may not have outside of the college.”

Other changes to the PCC include removing the MD trailers this Spring. Trailers housing student services will remain until  Building GG’s completion.

At the LAC, the renovation of the vocational nursing program Building C is anticipated to be finished in Spring 2016. It will feature hospital-simulation technology.

The culinary arts program will gain seven culinary labs, studio teaching kitchens and a working restaurant when the math technology and culinary building is completed, anticipated for this Summer.

Amanda Jones, 32, a culinary arts major, said, “Having more space is going to allow for more hands-on teaching and more times for classes to be offered.”

Construction is possible due to the voter-approved $616 million Measure E bonds, which LBCC President Eloy Oakley said in his Feb. 6 State of the College Address is in its 10th year of a 15-year modernization program.

Oakley went on to say that “our physical transformation is just the start. The real measure of our success is student success.  We are finding new ways to help students achieve their dreams.”

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